2005 - 2016

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  1. Open Stage Control is a libre desktop OSC bi-directionnal control surface application. It's built with HTML, JavaScript & CSS on top of Electron framework


    Download here : https://github.com/jean-emmanuel/open-stage-control/releases



    • mouse & multi-touch sensitive widgets
    • modular & responsive layout
    • built-in live editor
    • bi-directionnal osc bindings
    • headless server mode with any number of clients using chromium
    • app state store / recall & import / export
    • themes
    2 months ago / / /
  2. In July 2016, MoMA PS1 invited artist Katharina Grosse to transform a decaying former military building at Fort Tilden, Queens, into a monumental, sublime artwork using a specialized technique to spray brightly colored paint directly onto the structure. Grosse’s approach highlights the potential of painting as a medium, and encapsulates the stark beauty of this manmade structure and its natural surroundings.

    2 months ago / / / /


    An on-going series of digital installations situated in Google Earth. DDD was created by building 3d digital models and locating and animating them in Google Earth using KML code. The soundtrack was created using a well known song about the white cliffs of Dover.

    11 months ago / / /
  4. PabloDraw is an Ansi/Ascii text and RIPscrip vector graphic art editor/viewer with multi-user capabilities.

    11 months ago / /
  5. An Archive of 10,000 Cylinder Recordings Readied for the Spotify Era. The UCSB Library invites you to discover and listen to its online archive of cylinder recordings.


    11 months ago / / /
  6. 1 year ago / / / /
  7. Collaging like Painting with clouds...

    1 year ago / / /
  8. Satellite Collections
    digital prints

    You can see from pole to pole and across oceans and continents and you can watch it turn and there's no strings holding it up, and it's moving in a blackness that is almost beyond conception.
    -Eugene Cernan, an astronaut on the Apollo 17, on seeing the Earth from space

    In all of these prints, I collect things that I've cut out from Google Satellite View-- parking lots, silos, landfills, waste ponds. The view from a satellite is not a human one, nor is it one we were ever really meant to see. But it is precisely from this inhuman point of view that we are able to read our own humanity, in all of its tiny, repetitive marks upon the face of the earth. From this view, the lines that make up basketball courts and the scattered blue rectangles of swimming pools become like hieroglyphs that say: people were here.

    The alienation provided by the satellite perspective reveals the things we take for granted to be strange, even absurd. Banal structures and locations can appear fantastical and newly intricate. Directing curiosity toward our own inimitably human landscape, we may find that those things that are most recognizably human (a tangle of carefully engineered water slides, for example) are also the most bizarre, the most unlikely, the most fragile.


    1 year ago / / / / /
  9. Hiroyuki Hamada (b. 1968, Tokyo) has exhibited throughout the United States and in Europe and is represented by Lori Bookstein Fine Art. He has been awarded various residencies including those at the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, the Edward F. Albee Foundation/William Flanagan Memorial Creative Person’s Center, the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and the MacDowell Colony. Hamada’s work has been featured in various publications, including Stokstad and Cothren’s widely used art history text book Art: A Brief History (Pearseon). In 1998 he was the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, and in 2009 he was awarded a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship. Hamada lives and works in East Hampton, New York.

    1 year ago /
  10. Artificial Neural Networks have spurred remarkable recent progress in image classification and speech recognition. But even though these are very useful tools based on well-known mathematical methods, we actually understand surprisingly little of why certain models work and others don’t. So let’s take a look at some simple techniques for peeking inside these networks.

    We train an artificial neural network by showing it millions of training examples and gradually adjusting the network parameters until it gives the classifications we want. The network typically consists of 10-30 stacked layers of artificial neurons. Each image is fed into the input layer, which then talks to the next layer, until eventually the “output” layer is reached. The network’s “answer” comes from this final output layer.

    One of the challenges of neural networks is understanding what exactly goes on at each layer. We know that after training, each layer progressively extracts higher and higher-level features of the image, until the final layer essentially makes a decision on what the image shows. For example, the first layer maybe looks for edges or corners. Intermediate layers interpret the basic features to look for overall shapes or components, like a door or a leaf. The final few layers assemble those into complete interpretations—these neurons activate in response to very complex things such as entire buildings or trees.

    One way to visualize what goes on is to turn the network upside down and ask it to enhance an input image in such a way as to elicit a particular interpretation. Say you want to know what sort of image would result in “Banana.” Start with an image full of random noise, then gradually tweak the image towards what the neural net considers a banana (see related work in [1], [2], [3], [4]). By itself, that doesn’t work very well, but it does if we impose a prior constraint that the image should have similar statistics to natural images, such as neighboring pixels needing to be correlated.

  11. A video and audio tribute we did for mf doom flipping his beats re-creating them using original samples and adding videos to it we ve played this live as an opening act for mf doom mixed assembled and edited by sims, mass & alan the g artwork by julien sens

    1 year ago / / / / /
  12. 1 year ago /
  13. The Gallery of Concept Visualization features projects which use pictures to communicate complex and difficult ideas (not just data).

  14. 1 year ago / /
  15. Automatic Cinema aims at an artistic audience. The software can be used for exhibitions or installations, where a variety of media are served on various screens and channels – syncronized or not. Since all media assets are stored in a database, Automatic Cinema is also useful for documentarists and researchers with a structural approach to their material. And last but not least, Automatic Cinema is open source and can be developed by anybody. Instead of cutting a bunch of videoclips the hard way, Automatic Cinema generates countless versions based upon predefined styles. Probably, you'll end up seeing a movie you've never been thinking of — serendipity in it's best way.

    1 year ago / / /
Page 1 of 132May 2015 - September 2016 (2005 - 2016)

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