2005 - 2017

Wiki 24 Wiki




  1. Dazzle camouflage, also known as razzle dazzle or dazzle painting, was a family of ship camouflage used extensively in World War I and to a lesser extent in World War II. Credited to artist Norman Wilkinson, it consisted of complex patterns of geometric shapes in contrasting colours, interrupting and intersecting each other.

    Unlike some other forms of camouflage, dazzle works not by offering concealment but by making it difficult to estimate a target's range, speed and heading. Norman Wilkinson explained in 1919 that dazzle was intended more to mislead the enemy as to the correct position to take up than actually to miss his shot when firing.

    Dazzle was adopted by the British Admiralty and the U.S. Navy with little evaluation. Each ship's dazzle pattern was unique to avoid making classes of ships instantly recognisable to the enemy. The result was that a profusion of dazzle schemes was tried, and the evidence for their success was at best mixed. So many factors were involved that it was impossible to determine which were important, and whether any of the colour schemes were effective.

    Dazzle attracted the notice of artists, with Picasso notably claiming cubists had invented it. The vorticist artist Edward Wadsworth, who supervised the camouflaging of over 2,000 ships during the First World War, painted a series of canvases of dazzle ships after the war, based on his wartime work.

    3 years ago /
  2. Out-of-place artifact (OOPArt) is a term coined by American naturalist and cryptozoologist Ivan T. Sanderson for an object of historical, archaeological, or paleontological interest found in a very unusual or seemingly impossible context[1] that could challenge conventional historical chronology by being "too advanced" for the level of civilization that existed at the time, or showing "human presence" far before humans were supposed to exist.

    The term "out-of-place artifact" is rarely used by mainstream historians or scientists. Its use is largely confined to cryptozoologists, proponents of ancient astronaut theories, Young Earth creationists, and paranormal enthusiasts.[2] The term is used to describe a wide variety of objects, from anomalies studied by mainstream science to pseudoarchaeology far outside the mainstream, to objects that have been shown to be hoaxes or to have mundane explanations.

    Critics argue that most purported OOPArts which are not hoaxes are the result of mistaken interpretation, wishful thinking, or a mistaken belief that a particular culture couldn't have created an artifact or technology due to a lack of knowledge or materials. Supporters regard OOPArts as evidence that mainstream science is overlooking huge areas of knowledge, either willfully or through ignorance.[2]

    In some cases, the uncertainty results from inaccurate descriptions. For example: the Wolfsegg Iron was said to be a perfect cube, but in fact it is not; the Klerksdorp spheres were said to be perfect spheres, but they are not; and the Iron pillar of Delhi was said to be "rust proof", but it has some rust near its base.

    Many writers or researchers who question conventional views of human history have used purported OOPArts in attempts to bolster their arguments.[2] Creation Science relies on allegedly anomalous finds in the archaeological record to challenge scientific chronologies and models of human evolution.[3] Claimed OOPArts have been used to support religious descriptions of pre-history, ancient astronaut theories, or the notion of vanished civilizations that possessed knowledge or technology more advanced than our own.[2]

    3 years ago / /
  3. Polybius is a supposed arcade game featured in an Internet urban legend. According to the story, the Tempest-style game was released to the public in 1981, and caused its players to go insane, causing them to suffer from intense stress, horrific nightmares, and even suicidal tendencies. A short time after its release, it supposedly disappeared without a trace. Not much evidence for the existence of such a game has ever been discovered.




    3 years ago / / /
  4. Sikhote-Alin is an iron meteorite that fell in 1947 on the Sikhote-Alin Mountains in eastern Siberia. Though large iron meteorite falls had been witnessed previously and fragments recovered, never before in recorded history had a fall of this magnitude been observed.[3] An estimated 70 tonnes of material survived the fiery passage through the atmosphere and reached the Earth.[2]

    4 years ago / /
  5. Kiwix is an offline reader for Web content. It's especially intended to make Wikipedia available offline (see features). This is done by reading the content of the project stored in a file format ZIM, a high compressed open format with additional meta-data.

    5 years ago / /
  6. WikiMindMap is a tool to browse easily and efficiently in Wiki content, inspired by the mindmap technique.
    5 years ago / /
  7. Many Wikipedia articles are tagged with geographic coordinates. Many have references to historic events. Cross referencing these two subsets and plotting them year on year adds up to a dynamic visualization of Wikipedia's view of world history.
    6 years ago / /
  8. you type in a subject you would like to research and this generates a list (you choose its length) of related keywords and topics. You can visit a Wikipedia page at any time or continue navigating through the related keywords until you find what you want.
    9 years ago / /
  9. The InfoVis:Wiki project is intended to provide a community platform and forum integrating recent developments and news on all areas and aspects of Information Visualization.
    9 years ago / / /
  10. Wiki about isadora
    9 years ago / / / / /
  11. ArtSoftware.org is an open wiki community for sharing information about free and open source art software!
    9 years ago / / /
  12. It is based on the manuscript of New Media Art, a book written by Mark Tribe and Reena Jana and published by Taschen in 2006. The Taschen book is available in French, German, Italian and Spanish in addition to English. This wiki book is not intended as a
    10 years ago / / / /
  13. GERMINADOR wiki is an open and collaborative resource about net collective creation that is aimed at presenting experiences, identifying opportunities of experimentations and creating the suitable conditions for the generation of new proposals and for the
    10 years ago / / / / /
  14. 10 years ago / / /
  15. Einfahrung in die Softwareumgebung 'Eyesweb', die, aufbauend auf einem modularen Blockprinzip die Realisierung von mehrmedialen, d.h. Audio / Video / Netzwerkprojekten ermaglicht. Experimentelle interaktive Versuchsaufbauten, rechnergestatzte Verkna
    10 years ago / / /
Page 1 of 2January 2007 - September 2013 (2005 - 2017)

First / Previous / Next / Last /

Sort by: Date / Title / URL