2005 - 2017

Hardware 253 Hardware


  1. Open Stage Control is a libre desktop OSC bi-directionnal control surface application. It's built with HTML, JavaScript & CSS on top of Electron framework

     

    Download here : https://github.com/jean-emmanuel/open-stage-control/releases

     

    Features

    • mouse & multi-touch sensitive widgets
    • modular & responsive layout
    • built-in live editor
    • bi-directionnal osc bindings
    • headless server mode with any number of clients using chromium
    • app state store / recall & import / export
    • themes
    9 months ago / / /
  2. [ About Re:Sound Bottle -second mix- ]
    Experimental sound medium that transforms recorded everyday sounds into music

    [ Concept ]
    • Allows anyone to create music using sounds from daily life
    • Communication that arises from intuitive sound interaction

    The conventional way of experiencing music is usually through existing technologies such as the ipod or the radio. However, this style of experiencing music takes place in a given form; is static and as a result leaves us dissatisfied.

    To really enjoy music, we need to find music through sounds around us. We need to stop being tied down with new gadgets that provide the music for us, but to search for music ourselves.

    A series of ideas like these lead me to create this device.

    This creation's main concept is to record sounds from daily life. It is the concept of ‘collecting sounds in a bottle’. You choose the sounds collected in the bottle. Using everyday sounds as a musical component establishes a new understanding of the sounds we listen to everyday. By collecting your own sampling of sounds, you encounter a unique piece of music that can be experienced only once.

    This device will bring a smile to anyone, as many will be able to experience the charm of music, leading them to turn music into something they love and adore.

    Created by Jun Fujiwara

    2 years ago / / / / /
  3. Spacebrew is an open, dynamically re-routable software toolkit for choreographing interactive spaces. Or, in other words, a simple way to connect interactive things to one another. Every element you hook up to the system is identified as either a subscriber (reading data in) or a publisher (pushing data out). Data is in one of three standardized formats: a boolean (true/false), a number range (0-1023) or a string (text); it can also be sent as a custom format you specify. Once these elements are set up, you can use a web based visual switchboard to connect or disconnect publishers and subscribers to each other.

    2 years ago / / /
  4. Server offering chip music in all formats (MOD, XM, S3M, SID, YM, SAP, IT, AdLib) and platforms (Amiga, PC, Spectrum, NES.)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiptune

    3 years ago / / / /
  5. http://www.nearfield.org/2009/10/immaterials-the-ghost-in-the-field

    This video is about exploring the spatial qualities of RFID, visualised through an RFID probe, long exposure photography and animation. It features Timo Arnall of the Touch project and Jack Schulze of BERG. The problem and opportunity of invisibility RFID is still badly understood as an interactive technology. Many aspects of RFID interaction are fundamentally invisible; as users we experience two objects communicating through the ‘magic’ of radio waves. This invisibility is also key to the controversial aspects of RFID technology; once RFID antennas are hidden inside products or in environments, they can be invoked or initiated without explicit knowledge or permission. (See here for more on the invisibility of radio.) But invisibility also offers opportunities: the lack of touch is an enormous usability and efficiency leap for many systems we interact with everyday (hence the success of Oyster, Suica and Octopus cards). But there is also the ‘magic’ of nearness one of the most compelling experiential aspects of RFID. As designers we took this invisibility as a challenge. We needed to know more about the way that RFID technology inhabits space so that we could better understand the kinds of interactions that can be built with it and the ways it can be used effectively and playfully inside physical products.

    3 years ago / /


  6. OpenKnit is an open-source, low cost (under 550€), digital fabrication tool that affords the user the opportunity to create his own bespoke clothing from digital files. Starting from the raw material, the yarn, and straight to its end use, a sweater for example, in about an hour. Designing and producing clothes digitally and wearing them can now happen in the very same place, rewarding the user with the ability to make decisions regarding creativity and responsibility.

    3 years ago / /


  7. It can be a tricky task to debug and visualize realtime data on the Arduino board. You are usually stuck with the standard serial output, as the complexity of your Arduino code grows this makes it impossible to comprehend what is actually going on inside the board. To solve this I have created a little library that will enable you to create your own custom GUI for your Arduino projects.

  8. The DIY Cellphone is a working (albeit basic) cellphone that you can make yourself. It can make and receive phone calls and text messages, store names and phone numbers, and display the time. It builds on the hardware and software in the Arduino GSM Shield but extends it with a full interface, including display, buttons, speaker, microphone, etc. The source files for the cellphone are hosted on GitHub (hardware, software), which also includes an issue list where you can file bug reports or request enhancements.

    3 years ago /
  9. As GIF creators - OKKULT Motion Pictures is our brainchild - we know it's very easy to show/share an animated GIF on the web, but it's hard to find an offline GIF player to exhibit and sell a GIF as a single, unique artwork.

    We have conceived, designed and handcrafted the Giphoscope with the objective of proposing to artists/galleries/

    museums/collectors a minimalistic, unconventional, retrofuturistic analog GIF player, entirely tailor made andhandmade in ItalyThanks to Giphoscope, animated GIF becomes a tangible and exclusive artwork.

     

    The Giphoscope is inspired by the Mutoscope, an early motion picture device, patented by Herman Casler on November 21, 1894.

    The Mutoscope worked on the same principle as the "flip book". The individual image frames were conventional black-and-white, silver-based photographic prints on tough, flexible opaque cards. Rather than being bound into a booklet, the cards were attached to a circular core. A reel typically held about 850 cards, giving a viewing time of about a minute (from Wikipedia).


    3 years ago / /
  10. In 1991, Cuba's economy began to implode. "The Special Period in the Time of Peace" was the government's euphemism for what was a culmination of 30 years worth of isolation. It began in the 60s, with engineers leaving Cuba for America. Ernesto Oroza, a designer and artist, studied the innovations created during this period. He found that the general population had created homespun, Frankenstein-like machines for their survival, made from everyday objects. Oroza began to collect these machines, and would later contextualize it as "art" in a movement he dubbed "Technological Disobedience."

    Apparently Cuban President Raul Castro is currently shaming the corrupt by passing around confession videos of busted officials to the rest of the country’s elite. This brand of viral justice is a particularly creative application of technology in Cuba, which at once makes me think of Cuban-American artist Ernesto Oroza.

    Oroza has spent much of his time studying the technological innovations that popped up during “The Special Period in the Time of Peace,” the Cuban government’s euphemism for the 90s collapse of the country’s economy that’d been set up for thirty years of isolation. He found scores of homebrew, DIY machines that citizens made to get by when no other options existed. In 2010, Motherboard visited Oroza in Miami to talk about his discoveries and the mass of brilliant creations made by Cuba’s DIY inventors.

    Cuba’s inventor culture has its roots in the 70s, when a group of revolutionary-minded scientists and mechanics formed the National Association of Innovators and Rationalizers (ANIR). Building on the ethos of Che Guevara, ANIR untied hacker-minded folk with the needs of an isolated economy and the call of a socialist revolution. Oroza showed us his meticulous collection of machines from this era, which he has contextualized as art pieces in a movement he calls “Technological Disobedience.”

    Originally aired on Motherboard in 2011. Read the full article here:

    http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/mbtv-the-technological-disobedience-of-ernesto-oroza

    3 years ago / /
  11. This project is an online interactive featuring the Eagle lunar landing. The presentation includes original Apollo 11 spaceflight video footage, communication audio, mission control room conversations, text transcripts, and telemetry data, all synchronized into an integrated audio-visual experience.

    Until today, it has been impossible to comprehensively experience mankind's shining exploratory accomplishment in a singular experience. We have compiled hours of content available from public domain sources and various NASA websites. Thamtech staff and volunteers generously devoted their time to transcribe hours of speech to text. By using simultaneous space and land based audio and video, transcripts, images, spacecraft telemetry, and biomedical data—this synchronized presentation reveals the Moon Shot as experienced by the astronauts and flight controllers.

    Our goal is to capture a moment in history so that generations may now relive the events with this interactive educational resource. The world remembers the moon landing as a major historical event but often fails to recognize the scale of the mission. This interactive resource aims to educate visitors while engaging them with the excitement of manned-spaceflight to build a passion for scientific exploration.

    3 years ago / /
  12. WiSee is a novel interaction interface that leverages ongoing wireless transmissions in the environment (e.g., WiFi) to enable whole-home sensing and recognition of human gestures. Since wireless signals do not require line-of-sight and can traverse through walls, WiSee can enable whole-home gesture recognition using few wireless sources (e.g., a Wi-Fi router and a few mobile devices in the living room).

    WiSee is the first wireless system that can identify gestures in line-of-sight, non-line-of-sight, and through-the-wall scenarios. Unlike other gesture recognition systems like Kinect, Leap Motion or MYO, WiSee requires neither an infrastructure of cameras nor user instrumentation of devices. We implement a proof-of-concept prototype of WiSee and evaluate it in both an office environment and a two-bedroom apartment. Our results show that WiSee can identify and classify a set of nine gestures with an average accuracy of 94%.



  13. Pieterjan Grandry succeeded to build a device capable of playing animated gifs, incorporating led lights, microchips and magnetic sensors. The Gif player is a wooden box, much like a turntable, with a dimmer to adjust the speed of the animation and a small looking hole in the front.

  14. PixiVisor is a revolutionary tool for audio-visual experiments. Simple and fun, cross-platform application with unlimited potential for creativity! It consists of two parts: Transmitter and Receiver. Transmitter converts the video (static 64x64 image or 10FPS animation) to sound, pixel by pixel (progressive scan). This lets you listen to the sound of your image. But the main function of the Transmitter is to transmit the signal to the receiving devices. Receiver converts the sound (from microphone or Line-in input) back to video. You can set the color palette for this video, and record it to animated GIF file.

    4 years ago / / /
  15. Reverting to traditional handicrafts is one way to sabotage the throwaway society. In this article, we discuss another possibility: the design of modular consumer products, whose parts and components could be re-used for the design of other products.

    Initiatives like OpenStructures, Grid Beam, and Contraptor combine the modularity of systems like LEGO, Meccano and Erector with the collaborative power of digital success stories like Wikipedia, Linux or WordPress.

    An economy based on the concept of re-use would not only bring important advantages in terms of sustainability, but would also save consumers money, speed up innovation, and take manufacturing out of the hands of multinationals. 

    4 years ago / /
Page 1 of 17February 2013 - April 2015 (2005 - 2017)

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